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Top 5 Materials Used in Patios


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Tile
Don't use the same tile that you would in your kitchen or bathroom. Make sure it's supposed to be used outdoors.
Don't use the same tile that you would in your kitchen or bathroom. Make sure it's supposed to be used outdoors.
Dougal Waters/Digital Vision/Getty Images

Ceramic or porcelain tiles can make a very distinctive patio. Tiles come in a wide variety of styles and can create a very seamless transition from indoors to outdoors. While these tiles may resemble the tile that you might use in your bathroom or on the floor of your kitchen, be sure to use both tile and grout that are meant for exterior use. It's also important to use tiles that are not very porous, or will not absorb a lot of water, to resist damage from freezing and thawing with the change of seasons. Usually unglazed tiles work best for large walking spaces because they tend to be less slippery than glazed tiles.

Tile does have some potential downsides. It can be slick, so it might not be the best choice for spa or pool areas. It can also get slippery if it holds water for a long amount of time, causing a film of algae to grow on the surface. Finally, tile does tend to be more costly than brick and sometimes even more than stone.

Next, we'll look at brick as an alternative patio material.


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