Like HowStuffWorks on Facebook!

5 House Rules to Set with Your Dorm Roommate


4
Studying
Yes, we know that you're at college to get an education, but remember that people like to study at different times. Work it all out before you move in.
Yes, we know that you're at college to get an education, but remember that people like to study at different times. Work it all out before you move in.
James Woodson/Getty Images

When it comes to hitting the books, make sure you respect each other's rights to study -- and not study.

You might be thinking, "really?!" right about now. After all, studying sure seems like a conflict-free subject. You're going to college to get an education, right? So you should be able to study in your room when you need to. However, different study habits and course schedules can cause serious conflicts. If your roommate thinks it's important to get a good night's sleep but you tend to pull all-nighters right before a deadline, you may have a problem. What if you want quiet to read a book at night but she wants to hear music or watch TV while she crunches numbers?

Work out rules that cover study hours in the room, including whether "study hours" mean "quiet hours." There are various ways to compromise. Maybe you can agree to study in the library when quiet is required. The music lover might use headphones. Set sleep hours when studying must be done somewhere other than in the room, maybe in the dorm's lounge if it's late at night. If one of you is working with a group or a partner, meet outside the room. If your approaches to studying are very different, the best plan may be to agree that both of you will do most of your studying somewhere else.

Speaking of sleep, that's another area that often sparks dissension. Keep reading to learn more.


More to Explore