A bed of spring bulbs -- such as tulips or daffodils -- underplanted with forget-me-nots is a sight to behold. Biennials native to cool, moist areas of Europe and northern Asia, they are usually grown as annuals.

Description of forget-me-not: Forget-me-nots are small plants seldom reaching more than 12 inches in height and an equal diameter. The tiny flowers are clustered together in racemes at the top of plants.

Growing forget-me-not: Forget-me-nots relish cool, moist weather with sun or partial shade. In Zones 8, 9, and 10, seeds can be sown in the fall where plants will bloom in the spring. When planting in the spring, plant as soon as the soil can be worked. When plants have finished blooming, replace them with summer annuals. Forget-me-nots will reseed, but seedlings in colder climates will not bloom until late spring or summer.

Propagating forget-me-not: By seed. For early bloom in cold climates, seed indoors in January, planting seedlings outdoors as soon as the soil can be worked. Seeds germinate in 8 to 14 days at 55 to 70 degrees Fahrenheit. Be sure to cover seeds; they need darkness to germinate. When removing plants that have bloomed, shake the ripened seeds onto the ground where you want blooming plants the next spring.

Uses for forget-me-not: Plant forget-me-nots in masses for best results. They're suited for rock gardens, as an edging, or in the front of a border. Try them in window boxes and patio planters with spring bulbs. Grow forget-me-nots in meadows, along stream banks, or by ponds.

Forget-me-not related varieties: Indigo Compacta is a darker-colored selection that stays smaller than most varieties. Blue Ball is a compact form with bright blue flowers. White Ball is similar in form but has white blooms, Victoria Mixed combines blue-, white-, rose-, and pink-flowered forms.

Scientific name of forget-me-not: Myosotis sylvatica

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