Like HowStuffWorks on Facebook!

10 Tips for the Best Container Garden on the Block


8
Hang Your Baskets
Hanging baskets of ferns and flowers cascade from balconies in the French Quarter of New Orleans.
Hanging baskets of ferns and flowers cascade from balconies in the French Quarter of New Orleans.
Medioimages/Photodisc/Getty Images

One benefit of hanging baskets is that they're temporary. Replace their foliage seasonally or year to year, playing with new color schemes or looks for your home. Hanging baskets need to be fed, watered or deadheaded almost daily, so hang them in spots you can conveniently access. They can be hung many ways; a common method is from a bracket on a fence or wall.

When creating your own hanging basket, it's best to choose bushy, upright plants for the middle and trailing or creeping varieties to fill in gaps and spill over the sides. A combination of flowering and foliage plants works well.

To create a traditional hanging basket, cover the bottom of the container with black plastic to prevent water and soil loss. Layer the plastic with a few scoops of potting soil. Tuck sphagnum moss under the edge of the plastic to disguise it, then build up the sides with a thick layer of damp moss, packing it tightly. Add enough soil for the first level of plants. Carefully place rooted cuttings through the basket's sides so that the necks are just inside the basket, and cover rootballs with soil. Continue planting until you're done, then water.


More to Explore