Like many people, I love lists. I scribble them on envelopes, receipts, even on those postcard-size subscription inserts in magazines. And then there are the more permanent lists in my journal, which keep track of everything from movies I want to see to my long and complicated weekly to-do lists.

So when the Listography book launched in 2007, I was smitten ... until I pulled a copy off the shelf in a bookstore. It was heavy. The pages were thick. All I could think was, "This can't be a good use of paper resources." Sure, I loved the accompanying drawings and great list ideas, but this eco-geek figured a DIY project with a recycled paper notebook was in order.

When I finally got around to thinking about my own version of a Listography book, I headed to Listography.com for inspiration ... and I found a fantastic alternative to my planned notebook.

Listography.com is a lot more than a promotional website for the books--it's an online repository of lists made by people around the world. Anyone can sign up and it's free, so it's a fantastic green alternative to a book. Goodbye notebook, hello web!

Listography.com offers the best of all worlds. No paper means my lists are greener. You can keep each list private or make it public. Want to include photos? Go ahead. Links? Sure thing. All around, it's a great way to make all sorts of lists and keep track of everything--without requiring paper or buying a book. And while a web-based repository may have been limiting a few years ago, cell phones allow people go paperless with the web anytime, anywhere.

It's the ultimate forum for making and sharing lists, and users don't hold back. People list everything and anything, including what they did on a given day, bucket lists, likes, dislikes, places they want to travel to, and dates of haircuts. Some of the more unusual or creative lists that I've come across include:

- people with amazing teeth - tattoos I wish I had the guts to get - things to ask mama to send - random urges I sometimes get - songs with good whistling

My lists are a repository for memories and events in my life--a sort of virtual scrapbook that groups events and ideas thematically rather than chronologically. And it doesn't require any paper at all.