All the junk mail you receive is the result of your personal information being sold to marketing firms.

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How to Stop the Madness of Junk Mail

Your name and address actually have a monetary value associated with them. It's not worth much (perhaps a fraction of a cent) but when joined with thousands of other people's information, suddenly it's a valuable list. Direct marketing companies buy these lists from companies with whom you've conducted business. If you've ever ordered something from a catalog or applied for a credit card, you've provided your information to people who, in turn, sell that information to direct marketers.

Giving your personal information under some circumstances are worse than others. Responding to a sweepstakes can land you on a "sucker list," making you an above average target for marketers, since you've proven yourself gullible [source: MSNBC]. And filling out a warranty card isn't much better. Simply purchasing a product and keeping the receipt protects you under the manufacturer's warranty. Warranty cards are merely fishing expeditions by companies looking for beefed-up personal information (which explains why a maker of toaster ovens would be interested in what hobbies you enjoy).

If you've just realized that you've been suckered by marketing ploys, don't worry. With a little bit of effort, you can remove your name from the lists in circulation. And you can keep it off future lists by being more possessive of your information.

Contacting associations whose members are the people who mail you stuff you don't want is the best way to get your information off mailing lists. The direct marketing industry has professional organizations that also serve as touch points for consumers who don't want to receive mail from the groups' members any longer [source: KIRO]. You can also contact businesses that make their money generating lists and ask be removed. Even better, if you're the type who loves junk mail, you can actually do the opposite and opt to receive mail from organizations' members.

This is much the same with credit card and insurance offers. Lists are generated by credit reporting agencies who are allowed to sell your information to credit card companies. By law, they must also honor any request by a consumer to take them off credit offer lists for five years [source: FTC]. The major credit reporting bureaus maintain a central Web site for consumers to opt out of credit card offers through all bureaus at once. By contacting each bureau directly with a written request for your information to remain only in their possession, you can also keep them from providing your information to direct market groups, which can help slow the junk mail deluge.

There's a caveat to opting out of junk mail: To get your information out of circulation, you often have to provide it during the opt-out process. Groups that allow consumers to opt out of receiving junk mail may require them to register by filling out forms that ask for personal information like social security or credit card numbers. This is solely for verification; organizations that help you opt out don't sell information from opt-out requests. Some organizations do charge nominal processing fees, but such fees are advertised, not simply tacked onto your credit card without your knowledge. The fees are usually minor, and for anyone who truly hates junk mail, worth the money.

Ready to get started on the path toward a life uncluttered by junk mail? If so, move along to the next page and use the links provided (including a great article by consumer expert Sid Kirchheimer, which is lousy with helpful addresses, links and phone numbers). And for more information on consumer victimization and other related topics, visit the next page.