Decisions, Decisions!

You’re going to be living with the tile for some time, so it’s probably worth your while to make three decisions before purchasing anything. Consider these questions in your decision-making:

  1. What tile appeals to you? Consider not only the color of the tile but also the design. Working with a design can be more difficult.
  2. What color grout do you want? Do you want a dark color to make the lines of grouting stand out?
  3. How much space are you going to place between the tiles? If the gap is 3/16-inch (about a half a centimeter) or smaller, nonsanded grout is your best option. Don’t use sanded grout on anything smaller than 3/16-inch lines [source: DIYonline.com]. ­

Grouting Floor Tile

To grout floor tile, grout the tile joints only after the mortar of the new tile floor has set, which will take two to three days. Take away any spacers you've placed and sweep or vacuum the floor as needed. If the manufacturer suggests doing so, use a presealer before you begin grouting. Wearing safety equipment, mix the grout in small batches that you can use it within a half hour. After that, it will be too stiff to use. Dont add water to soften the grout; just toss it.

Begin grouting in a corner and work toward the center. Spread the face of the tile with grout, then use a squeegee or rubber grout float to force it into every joint. Remove extra grout from the tile surface [source: Findanyfloor.com].

About 15 to 20 minutes after you've applied the grout, it will be dry enough to begin cleaning the floor. Carefully wipe all extra grouting from the tile face, using a sponge and bucket filled with clean water. Remember to refresh the water often [source: Findanyfloor.com].

Do you still have some questions about grout before you begin your project? You might wonder about the difference between epoxy and acrylic grouting. If you're trying to figure out which one will best complete your project, read on for more information.