Make a Statement­

Here’s a way to figure out if you want to use colored grout. If you select a grout color close to the tile color, you’ll downplay the geometric pattern of the tiles. If, on the other hand, you want to emphasize the pattern, use a contrasting color of grout [source: Maki]. ­

Acrylic Tile Grouting

­If you're concerned about adhesion qualities, consider using an acrylic tile grout additive. The silicone additive, which comes premixed with Portland cement grout, aid­s in greater adhesion. Because of its stability in freezes and thaws, it can be used outdoors, making it perfect for deck or garage projects. The additive helps the grout retain color and resisting stains. It's the kind of grout that most fast-food restaurants use on their floors. Some companies specialize in creating acrylic caulks to match tile or paint colors [source: Wm. Smethurst & Son, Inc., Super-Tek, Keilholz].

One of the benefits of using acrylic latex grout is that it can be maneuvered into small spaces. Gaps of less than an eighth of an inch (roughly a half centimeter) are suitable for acrylic grout. It's also the perfect choice for marble tiles, because a sanded grout will scratch them. It's great for repair work, too [source: Lowe's].

Another advantage of acrylic grout is that you don't have to cover the entire work surface. You can just apply it in the joints between the tiles [source: Keilholz].

In some cases, you can add an acrylic latex mix to your grout. It's a milky liquid that you add to the mix in lieu of water. If your grout is labeled "polymer-modified," however, you can't add the acrylic latex [source: Maki].

Congratulations -- having reviewed the types of grouting and when to use them, you're now ready to shop for tiles and grout! You're about to embark on a project that will satisfy you every time you walk into the room.