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6
Metal Work

Pewter Polishing

Because it is a soft metal and can be easily damaged, pewter must be given special care. To give your pewter items a refreshed glow, try this homemade, all-green cleaner:

Mix 1 teaspoon salt and 1 cup vinegar. Add enough flour to the mixture to make a paste. Apply the paste using a soft cloth and allow itto dry for half an hour. Rinse the piece thoroughly with warm water and polish with another soft cloth. Make sure all the paste is removed from any grooves or hidden areas. ­

Metal polishes, such as those for brass, copper, stainless steel, and chrome, are also on our Terrible Ten list -- and for good reason. Most metal polishes contain ammonia and usually at least one type of acid, among other undisclosed ingredients. This is another area where it's a good idea to try greener methods first before plunging into the use of harsh commercial products.

Do you have tarnished copper or brass antiques? Give them loads of shine without doing any damage by bringing in salt and vinegar and adding one more ingredient from your kitchen cupboard: flour. Make a paste using equal parts of the three ingredients; rub the paste onto the brass or copper item with a soft cloth. Cover the entire surface and let the whole thing dry out (this will take about an hour). Wipe off the dried paste with a clean, soft cloth.

Lemon can also be used for lightly tarnished brass or copper pieces. Slice one lemon and dip it in salt, then rub the item with the salted lemon. Afterward, rinse and dry thoroughly.

Another fix for lightly tarnished copper is to use a spray bottle filled with undiluted vinegar. Just spray the copper piece and sprinkle the tarnished area with salt. Wipe thoroughly with a sponge or cotton cloth; be sure to remove all the salt, or the item will turn green. Repeat if necessary.

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