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How to Remove Insecticide Stains


As if bugs weren't enough trouble, sometimes the insecticide we use to keep our many-legged friends away finds its way onto a household surface. Learn how to keep both our creepy-crawly friends and insecticide stains at bay.

How to Remove Insecticide Stains From:

Acetate, Carpet (synthetic or wool), Fiberglass, Rayon, Silk, Triacetate, Wool

Sponge (the method of using a dampened pad to apply light strokes, moving outward from the center of the stain) the area with a dry-cleaning solvent, K2r Spot Lifter (except on acetate blends) or Afta Cleaning Fluid. Then apply a dry spotter to the stain and cover with an absorbent pad moistened with dry spotter. Let it stand as long as any stain is being removed. Change the pad as it picks up the stain. Keep the stain and pad moist with dry spotter. Flush (the method of applying stain remover to loosen staining material and residue from stain removers) with one of the liquid dry-cleaning solvents. If any stain persists, sponge it with water and apply wet spotter and a few drops of ammonia. Cover with a pad dampened with wet spotter. Let stand as long as any stain is being removed. Change the pad as it picks up the stain. Keep the stain and pad moist with wet spotter and ammonia -- do not use ammonia on silk or wool. Flush with water and allow to dry.

How to Remove Insecticide Stains From:

Acrylic Fabric, Cotton, Linen, Nylon, Olefin, Polyester, Spandex

Sponge the area with a dry-cleaning solvent, K2r Spot Lifter, or Afta Dry Cleaning Fluid. Apply a dry spotter to the stain and cover with an absorbent pad moistened with dry spotter. Let it stand as long as any stain is being removed. Change the pad as it picks up the stain. Keep the stain and pad moist with dry spotter. Flush with one of the liquid dry-cleaning solvents. If any stain remains, sponge it with water and apply a wet spotter and a few drops of ammonia. Cover with a pad dampened with wet spotter. Let stand as long as any stain is being removed. Change the pad as it picks up the stain. Keep the stain and pad moist with wet spotter and ammonia. Flush with water and allow to dry.

How to Remove Insecticide Stains From:

Acrylic Plastic, Aluminum, Bamboo, Cane, Cork, Glass, Linoleum, Paint (flat or gloss), Plexiglas, Polyurethane, Porcelain Dishes, Porcelain Fixtures, Stainless Steel, Vinyl Clothing, Vinyl Tile, Vinyl Wallcovering

Wipe surface with a cloth or sponge dipped in warm sudsy water to which a few drops of ammonia have been added. Rinse well and wipe dry.

How to Remove Insecticide Stains From:

Asphalt, Bluestone, Brick, Concrete, Flagstone, Granite, Masonry Tile, Sandstone, Slate, Terrazzo

Wash stain with a solution of washing soda or detergent (never soap) and water. Use a cloth or soft-bristled brush. Rinse thoroughly with clear water and allow to dry.

How to Remove Insecticide Stains From:

Leather, Suede

Mix a solution of mild soap in lukewarm water. Swish to create a great volume of suds. Apply only the foam with a sponge or cloth. Wipe with a clean dry cloth. If a grease stain remains, powder the area with an absorbent such as cornmeal. Give it plenty of time to work, then gently brush it off. Repeat if necessary. On leather only, follow with Tannery Vintage Leather Cleaner & Conditioner or Fiebing's Saddle Soap to condition the leather.

How to Remove Insecticide Stains From:

Wallpaper

Wipe the area with a cloth or sponge moistened with cool clear water. Overlap the strokes to prevent streaking. With a clean cloth, gently pat area dry.

How to Remove Insecticide Stains From:

Wood

Mix dishwashing detergent in hot water and swish to make a great volume of suds. Dip a cloth in only the foam and apply to the stain. Rinse with a clean cloth moistened with clear water. Polish or wax as soon as possible.

Nothing breaks up a picnic like a parade of ants, but thanks to these stain removal tips you needn't be bugged by insecticide stains.

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