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How Jackhammers Work


Jackhammers are Hard
Shift change! Rotating the workers running a jackhammer helps reduce the risk of damage from the repetitive stress on their muscles and bones.
Shift change! Rotating the workers running a jackhammer helps reduce the risk of damage from the repetitive stress on their muscles and bones.
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Jackhammers are heavy, powerful tools, and they take a toll on the human body. The weight and vibration inherent to jackhammers tends to wear out even hardened construction workers.

Some companies regularly rotate workers on jackhammer duty to save their strength and spare them the constant work of controlling such powerful machines. Adequately rested workers are less likely to make mistakes or hurt themselves.

Jackhammers are renowned and often despised for the racket they create. That's why many modern jackhammers include silencer boots to dampen their noise output. Yet these rock-breaking marvels still rate as one of the noisiest tools, often subjecting workers to 130 decibels, which is louder than a jet engine at takeoff. As such, hearing protection is necessary protective equipment for both the jackhammer operator and anyone nearby.

Excessive vibration from jackhammers can also damage the human body. Even with vibration dampening components, the relentless violence exacted upon the concrete below comes back on the operator to some degree. Too much vibration can cause fatigue, headaches, stomach issues, insomnia, and muscular and skeletal issues.

Medical researchers link power-tool vibration to Raynaud's phenomenon, which affects blood vessels in the extremities. After too much jackhammer vibration exposure, people who suffer from this condition wind up with poor circulation in their hands, which might even turn white from lack of blood.


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