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How Lawn Edging Works

Lawn Edging Installation Tips

The key when installing lawn edging is to reduce your work over the long run. You want to do it right the first time so you don't have to fix or replace your lawn edging every season. Choose the right material for your climate and lawn, and then carefully follow the manufacturer's instructions for installing it.

Before you install any edging, cut a clean edge between your lawn and flowerbeds (or any other area you're edging) to delineate the border. You can use a marker, such as a flat piece of wood, string, or garden hose to map out the borders of your flowerbeds (or whatever area you're edging). If any grass or weeds have already snuck in, pull them and spray with weed killer before you start edging.

Probably the easiest way to install edging is to simply place it where you need it and pound it into the ground with a hammer. Just know that if you do it this way, it will eventually pop out. A better option is to dig a trench about 4 to 6 inches (10 to 15 centimeters) deep using your marked line as a guide. Then install your edging material -- bricks, pavers and everything else you'll need -- inside the trench. Your edging will remain in place even longer if you anchor it with stakes pounded into the ground at a 45-degree angle.

Make sure the tops of the edging are even with one another and aren't too high. You don't want your edging to be the first thing people see when they look at your lawn. About a half-inch (1.27 centimeters) above the soil will separate your edging without highlighting it. Then you can still mow right over the top of it. When you're done edging, use the extra soil from digging your trench (or mulch) to fill in around the edging.

Finally, step back and look at your handiwork. You'll see how beautiful borders can make your yard a real standout.

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