Advertisement

Creating Study Space for Your Kids

No one likes homework, but with supplies on hand in his study area, this boy is more likely to complete his assignments on time.
No one likes homework, but with supplies on hand in his study area, this boy is more likely to complete his assignments on time.
iStockphoto/Thinkstock

"Study" is a four-letter word to many kids, but as a parent, your job is to make sure that homework gets done. You can help even the most challenged students beef up their study habits by helping them establish a routine. To get them going in the right direction, try to encourage homework at the same time each evening. Having a designated study area that's designed to meet their individual learning styles is also important. From having the right supplies on hand to displaying their academic accomplishments, the tips on the next few pages can help bring out the studious in your student.

Advertisement

Advertisement

When choosing a study space, consider your child's personality. Is he or she someone who prefers to work in absolute silence, or will your budding scholar fare better with some activity, noise or movement nearby? Should studying occur before or after dinner, and what about listening to music while studying? Considering your children's personalities when designing their study spaces is a good idea; in fact, you should work with your kids in designing their area. If you get them involved, you're more likely to create a space they'll like and therefore use. If there's room for a desk in their bedroom, having a personal space dedicated to each child is great. But if not, you can designate a common area as study space. A kitchen table or a corner of the living room is a good option, and you could even convert a small closet into a desk area that can be shut when not in use. Just be sure it's a space with limited distractions. Setting them up next to their PS3 isn't an ideal place to keep them focused on their homework.

Advertisement

Advertisement

With a desk and chair at the right height, this girl comfortably completes her homework.
With a desk and chair at the right height, this girl comfortably completes her homework.
Comstock/Thinkstock

Once you have the work surface established, you'll need some necessary accessories. Good lighting is important, so some sort of desk lamp is a must. A chair that puts them at the proper desk height is a good investment. They'll need plenty of materials at their fingertips to complete homework and projects, so stocking up with plenty of pencils, paper and age-appropriate desk supplies is crucial. Elementary schoolers need a good stock of crayons and kid scissors, while high schoolers require pens, staplers and tape. Get them involved in the purchase of their supplies and use this as an opportunity to teach them to stay tidy and organized. A calendar is also a useful tool to help them prioritize and learn to set and track deadlines. Additionally, a timer is good for kids who may need some help staying on track. If there's room, extra seating space is helpful for longer reading assignments. A comfy chair or beanbag is a good option, and even the bed is great for reading, unless that makes them too comfortable -- you don't want them to fall asleep mid-page. And it never hurts to hang a bulletin board full of accomplishments to keep their spirits up. Youngsters may enjoy looking at art they made, while a high schooler can stay motivated by seeing the big red "A" on the hard test they aced.

Advertisement

Advertisement

Related Articles

Sources

  • Bartlett, Tom. "Why Don't Students Study Anymore?" The Chronicle of Higher Education. April 30, 2010. (Aug. 16, 2010) http://chronicle.com/blogPost/Why-Dont-Students-Study/23631/
  • Bochan, Toby Leah and Shama Narang. "A Space That Makes You Want to Study (Or at least helps you get homework done better, faster, and more comfortably." Scholastic, Inc. 2010. (Aug. 16, 2010) http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=1614
  • Child Development Institute. "Tips for Helping Kids and Teens With Homework and Study Habits." 2010. (Aug. 6, 2010) http://www.childdevelopmentinfo.com/learning/studytips.shtml
  • George, Kelly. "Create a kid's study space at home." Examiner.com. Aug. 4, 2010. (Aug. 16, 2010) http://www.examiner.com/home-living-in-atlanta/create-a-kid-s-study-space-at-home
  • Gervais, Angelique. "The ABCs of Creating a Study Space for Your Kid's Bedroom." HomeImprovementIdeas.net. 2010. (Aug. 16, 2010) http://www.homeimprovementideas.net/articles/the-abcs-of-creating-a-study-space.html

Advertisement


Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement