How To Make Wet & Dry Spotters

Dry Spotter:

To make a dry spotter, combine 1 part coconut oil (available at pharmacies and health food stores) and 8 parts liquid dry-cleaning solvent. This solution may be stored if the container is tightly capped to prevent evaporation of the solvent. Mineral oil may be substituted for the coconut oil, but is not quite as effective.

Caution: Dry-cleaning solvents are poisonous and may

be flammable.

Wet spotter:

To prepare a wet spotter, mix 1 part glycerine, 1 part white dishwashing detergent, and 8 parts water. Shake well before each use. Store wet spotter in a plastic squeeze bottle.

If floor wax spots have led you to pacing, then look no further. The following are effective and safe stain removal steps you can take to remove those pesky spots.

Remove Floor Wax Spots From:

Acetate, Carpet/Synthetic, Carpet/Wool,

Rayon, Silk, Triacetate, Wool

Sponge (the method of using light strokes with a dampened pad working outward from the center of the stain) the area with a dry-cleaning solvent or K2r Spot Lifter (except on acetate blends). Then apply a dry spotter to the stain and cover with an absorbent pad dampened with dry spotter. Let it stand as long as any stain is being picked up. Change the pad as it removes the stain. Keep both the stained area and the pad moist with dry spotter. Flush (the method of applying stain remover to loosen staining materials and residue from stain removers) with a dry-cleaning solvent and allow to dry. If any stain remains, sponge with water and apply a few drops of ammonia (take care when using ammonia on silk and wool). Cover with an absorbent pad dampened with wet spotter. Let stand as long as any stain is being removed. Change the pad as it picks up the stain. Keep stain and pad moist with wet spotter and ammonia. Flush with water. Repeat until no more stain is removed.

Remove Floor Wax Spots From:

Acrylic Fabric, Cotton, Linen, Modacrylic,

Nylon, Olefin, Polyester, Spandex

Remove any excess wax, then sponge the area with a dry-cleaning solvent or K2r Spot Lifter. Apply a dry spotter to the stain and cover with an absorbent pad dampened with the dry spotter. Let it stand as long as any stain is being removed. To help remove stubborn wax, tamp (the method of bringing a brush down with light strokes on stained durable fabrics and materials) the area, adding dry spotter as needed to keep it moist. Flush the area with one of the liquid dry-cleaning solvents and allow to dry. If a stain persists, sponge it with water and apply a few drops of ammonia along with a wet spotter. Cover the area with an absorbent pad and let it remain as long as any stain is being removed. Change the pad as it picks up the stain. Keep the stain and pad moist with wet spotter and ammonia. Tamping again will help break up the stain. Flush with water. Repeat if necessary.

Remove Floor Wax Spots From:

Acrylic Plastic, Alabaster, Asphalt Bamboo, Cane, Ceramic,

Glass/Tile, Cork, Paint/Flat, Paint/Gloss, Plexiglas, Polyurethane,

Porcelain Dishes, Porcelain Fixtures, Vinyl Clothing, Vinyl Wallcovering

Remove any excess wax. Wipe the surface with a cloth or sponge dipped in warm sudsy water to which a few drops of ammonia have been added. Rinse well and wipe dry with a clean cloth.

Remove Floor Wax Spots From:

Leather, Suede

Blot up any excess wax. Apply Tannery Vintage Leather Cleaner & Conditioner on leather only. On suede, test a dry-cleaning solvent on an inconspicuous place; then if no color change occurs, gingerly apply. Allow to dry. On leather only, follow with Tannery Vintage Leather Cleaner & Conditioner or Fiebing's Saddle Soap to condition the leather.

Remove Floor Wax Spots From:

Wood

Gently wipe up the excess with a cloth dipped in the suds of a mild detergent and water to which a small amount of ammonia has been added. Rinse well with a clean cloth moistened with the solution. Polish or wax as soon as possible.

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