ATLANTA (April 11, 2005) - HowStuffWorks and Chick-fil-A, the second largest quick-service chicken restaurant chain in the country, announced today that a series of five informative and entertaining card sets featuring HowStuffWorks content will be distributed through Chick-fil-A's educationally based Kid's Meal program from April 11 through May 7, 2005.

HowStuffWorks created the five illustrated card sets, which include Vehicle Tech, Forces of Nature, Human Body, Around the House, and Fun and Games. Answering questions such as "What happens to food once it hits the stomach?" or "How does a 4.5 million-pound space shuttle fly?" the age-specific card sets were developed to explain the uniqueness of how things work while demonstrating how science and technology can be cool.

If kids or parents are interested in learning more or are searching for an informative resource to help with homework, they can visit www.howstuffworks.com to enjoy the comprehensive article features that inspired the program.

Using an award-winning writing style, HowStuffWorks, a division of The Convex Group, has helped demystify the world for millions of curious people through its flagship Web site, www.howstuffworks.com, as well as HowStuffWorks Express, an acclaimed kids' magazine.

Gabe Vehovsky, the vice president of marketing and business development at HowStuffWorks said, "Our content features are detailed enough to intrigue and inform demanding readers yet simple and entertaining enough to be appropriate for all ages. We're excited to have the opportunity to work with Chick-fil-A on this program by presenting our content in a way that will both educate and entertain children." "Chick-fil-A constantly seeks to complement its quality children's menu offerings with educational and character-building tools, which we hope children enjoy while they learn and communicate with their families," said Steve Robinson, Chick-fil-A's senior vice president of marketing. "The HowStuffWorks content complements Chick-fil-A's family-focus strategy."

Since the re-invention of its educational premium strategy in 1997, Chick-fil-A has taken a developmental approach to its Kid's Meal offers, pairing its nutritious menu offerings -- including the quick-service industry's first fresh fruit cup to be offered system-wide by a chain -- with enriching premium items. While other leading quick-service chains often partner with entertainment groups to develop toys touting the latest children's movie or television show, Chick-fil-A prefers premiums that are educational or that promote character development and encourage family interaction.