The pump is the main part of the swimming pool circulation system. The pumping system clears debris from the water and keeps chemicals mixed by pushing water into the filtration system and back out again. Many variables determine how much time you need to run the filtration system, including the size of the pool and how often it's used. Debris that blows into the pool can affect water clarity, as well.

Conserving energy affects both the environment and your pocket. If you use a smaller, high-efficiency pump and operate it only for as many hours as absolutely necessary, you will be doing a lot toward lowering your pool maintenance costs. Chemicals that you add to your pool while the water is circulating don't need to be recirculated; they will stay mixed even if you don't pump the water continually. Although it's generally recommended that all the pool water undergo filtration every 24 hours, the pump does not need to run all the time.

A proactive, productive and energy-saving maintenance activity is to remove the debris floating on the pool surface with a hand-held skimmer. One way to keep control of the time you run the swimming pool pump is to run it several times a day for short periods of time. If you want to activate the pump once a day, start with six hours, but never go lower than five hours, especially in the summer. If your pool is in constant use, you may need to run the pump for up to eight hours per day, frequently checking the water clarity and chemical balance. Using a smaller pump for fewer hours per day is effective and will drastically reduce your electricity bill.