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Golden Barrel Cactus


Golden barrel cactus is sometimes called mother-in-law's cushion -- perhaps because of the hooked spines that covers it. See more pictures of cacti.

Golden barrel cactus is very easy to care for and can survive relatively dark conditions, however; it does prefer a sunny spot.

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The golden barrel cactus forms a single very round globe of often gigantic dimensions: Specimens four feet in diameter are not unusual. Its ribs are lined with hooked yellow spines. The top of the plant is covered with thick, white wool. The yellow, cup-shaped flowers are rarely produced indoors and, even then, only on mature specimens.

This cactus can tolerate low light for a surprisingly long time, showing no signs of growth and needing almost no water. It will, however, suddenly rot away. For healthy growth, full sun is required.

Golden Barrel Cactus Quick Facts

Scientific Name: Echinocactus grusonii

Common Names: Golden Barrel, Barrel Cactus, Mother-in-Law’s Cushion

Light Requirement for Golden Barrel Cactus: Full Sun

Water Requirement for Golden Barrel Cactus: Drench, Let Dry

Humidity for Golden Barrel Cactus: Average Home

Temperature for Golden Barrel Cactus: Cold

Fertilizer for Golden Barrel Cactus: High Phosphorus

Potting Mix for Golden Barrel Cactus: Cactus

Propagation of Golden Barrel Cactus: Seed

Decorative Use for Golden Barrel Cactus: Floor, Table

Care Rating for Golden Barrel Cactus: Very Easy

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR:Larry Hodgson is a full time garden writer out of Quebec City in the heart of French Canada where he grows well over 3,000 species and varieties. His book credits include Making the Most of Shade, The Garden Lovers Guide to Canada, Perennials for Every Purpose, Annuals for Every Purpose, Houseplants for Dummies, and Ortho's Complete Guide to Houseplants, as well as other titles in English and French. He's the winner of the Perennial Plant Association's 2006 Garden Media Award.


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