Lawn and Garden

Yard and lawn care is an important part of maintaining a home. Learn about landscaping and get yard tips and advice from the experts at HowStuffWorks.

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Zoysia is that lovely springy carpet-like grass you often see on golf courses and lawns in warm climates. But is it easy to grow? And how do you care for it?

By Alia Hoyt

Ranunculus is a genus containing more than 600 species, all of which are beautiful, but toxic to both humans and animals.

By Carrie Tatro

Tiger lilies have it all – they're edible, have healing properties and act as perfect pollinator magnets. They're also long-lasting, strikingly beautiful and super easy to grow.

By Carrie Tatro

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Bee balm is one of those staple plants that gardeners love for its beauty, its many varieties and its value as a magnet for pollinators.

By Carrie Tatro

Potting soil looks an awful lot like dirt, except there's likely no earth in the mix. So, what is it really made of? And is it better for potted plants than the stuff from the ground?

By Alia Hoyt

A cinch to plant and tend, forsythia is beloved for its vivid yellow blooms. They also mark the beginning. Here's how to grow and care for these beauties.

By Alia Hoyt

Providing a great backdrop for any sunny garden, the butterfly bush comes in many colors and attracts butterflies, hummingbirds and bees galore.

By Wendy Bowman

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The money tree has long been a symbol of good fortune in Asia. But how did the plant get its name?

By Alia Hoyt & Kathryn Whitbourne

Kohlrabi is a cruciferous vegetable, just like cabbage, with a slightly sweeter flavor. It's also known as a German turnip and can be eaten raw or cooked.

By Stephanie Vermillion

Those white beads you see in potting soil are made of a volcanic glass called perlite. And that's not the only place you'll see this versatile material. So how is it made and what is it used for?

By Nathan Chandler

You know that an apple a day keeps the doctor away, but what's your IQ on the lesser-known fruits (and veggies) of the world? Take our quiz to find out!

By Alia Hoyt

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One of the oldest and most widely used materials in the world, baked clay or terracotta, can be found on roofs, in museums and in gardens all over the world.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Curious to know how old those big trees are in your yard? We'll tell you how to use geometry to figure out their ages without risking their health.

By Stephanie Vermillion

If you don't already have a trellis working for you in your garden, you probably need one.

By Alia Hoyt

Despite being pretty in pink, oleander is a highly poisonous plant. And now it's being touted as a cure for COVID-19. We'll break down the facts from fiction.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

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This pretty flower has been known for centuries to have chemicals that can regulate your heartbeat but also poison you.

By Alia Hoyt

Sunflowers are incredibly tough and can be grown in almost any soil. Plus, it's hard not to smile when you see a field of these bright yellow rays.

By Wendy Bowman

For decades we've been told having houseplants can improve our indoor air quality. But is this true? And do you need to live in a veritable jungle to get better air quality?

By Patty Rasmussen

What vegetable is often mistaken for a fruit, has poisonous leaves but is still edible and is often harvested by candlelight? Yep, that would be rhubarb.

By Tara Yarlagadda

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These showy pink, purple, red and white blossoms dazzle through the spring and summer and are ubiquitous throughout the southern U.S.

By Wendy Bowman

Lots of trees are losing their leaves this time of the year. But evergreens keep theirs year-round. What gives?

By Wendy Bowman

Stop bagging those leaves and putting them curbside to be hauled off to the landfill. There's a better way — for your lawn and the environment.

By Patty Rasmussen

Roundup is the brand name for the chemical glyphosate, which is the most widely used weedkiller today. Some hail it, some hate it, but what does it really do?

By Chris Pollette

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Cucamelons are about the size of grapes but they pack a big tart punch.

By Nathan Chandler