Gardening

Gardening is a useful and relaxing pastime. Read gardening tips and learn how to plan and care for a variety of gardens.

Learn More

Square Foot Gardening is great for people who want to grow their own veggies and who also like very specific instructions.

By Jesslyn Shields

Beneficial insects can help keep your garden healthy and beautiful and are far more environmentally friendly than pesticides.

By Jesslyn Shields

Looking for an easy way to propagate new plants from existing ones? Rooting hormone can help turn one plant into two.

By Jesslyn Shields

Advertisement

If you're looking for an easy, organic way to improve your soil and create a permanent, thriving garden bed, a hugelkultur bed will check all the boxes for you.

By Kate Morgan

In a world so heavily dependent on pharmaceuticals, it's a wonderful thing to be able to treat some common maladies straight out of your garden.

By Kate Morgan

A study published in the journal Ecology Letters highlights the benefits of urban gardens for their human caretakers and local ecosystems.

By Rebecca Owen

Most of us just pee and flush without giving it a second thought, but your urine, when used correctly, can be a great fertilizer for your garden.

By Kate Morgan

Advertisement

Learn which plants benefit each other — and which plants shouldn't be neighbors — to get the most out of your garden.

By Kate Morgan

Did you know you don't need a plot of dirt or a ton of space to grow a lush vegetable and flower garden? You can get started with a bale of straw.

By Kate Morgan

"Lasagna gardening" is a no-till, no-dig method of organic gardening that helps create rich, healthy soil and requires very little work to get started.

By Kate Morgan

Farmers grow giant pumpkins heavier than cars using one seed variety. And one grower just set a new world record, squashing the competition.

By Muriel Vega

Advertisement

Removing the spent blooms from your flowering plants will keep your garden looking its best and help your plants stay focused on reblooming.

By Laurie L. Dove

David Latimer put a plant and some compost in a bottle in 1960. It's still alive and thriving over 60 years later. How does a closed ecosystem like this work?

By Jesslyn Shields

Ranunculus is a genus containing more than 600 species, all of which are beautiful, but toxic to both humans and animals.

By Carrie Tatro

Tiger lilies have it all – they're edible, have healing properties and act as perfect pollinator magnets. They're also long-lasting, strikingly beautiful and super easy to grow.

By Carrie Tatro

Advertisement

Bee balm is one of those staple plants that gardeners love for its beauty, its many varieties and its value as a magnet for pollinators.

By Carrie Tatro

Potting soil looks an awful lot like dirt, except there's likely no earth in the mix. So, what is it really made of? And is it better for potted plants than the stuff from the ground?

By Alia Hoyt

A cinch to plant and tend, forsythia is beloved for its vivid yellow blooms. They also mark the beginning. Here's how to grow and care for these beauties.

By Alia Hoyt

Providing a great backdrop for any sunny garden, the butterfly bush comes in many colors and attracts butterflies, hummingbirds and bees galore.

By Wendy Bowman

Advertisement

The money tree has long been a symbol of good fortune in Asia. But how did the plant get its name?

By Alia Hoyt & Kathryn Whitbourne

Kohlrabi is a cruciferous vegetable, just like cabbage, with a slightly sweeter flavor. It's also known as a German turnip and can be eaten raw or cooked.

By Stephanie Vermillion

Those white beads you see in potting soil are made of a volcanic glass called perlite. And that's not the only place you'll see this versatile material. So how is it made and what is it used for?

By Nathan Chandler

You know that an apple a day keeps the doctor away, but what's your IQ on the lesser-known fruits (and veggies) of the world? Take our quiz to find out!

By Alia Hoyt

Advertisement

One of the oldest and most widely used materials in the world, baked clay or terracotta, can be found on roofs, in museums and in gardens all over the world.

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

If you don't already have a trellis working for you in your garden, you probably need one.

By Alia Hoyt