Electric Oven: Repairs and Maintenance

Electric ranges and ovens are generally easy to repair, because there's not much to go wrong and there's not much you can do. Most repairs are actually replacements, a matter of unplugging the old part and plugging in the new. Most of the malfunctions that affect electric ranges involve faulty heating elements.

Caution: Before doing any work on an electric range or oven, make sure it's unplugged, or turn off the power to the unit by removing one or more fuses or tripping one or more breakers at the main entrance panel or at a separate panel. If the range is fused at a separate panel, this panel may be located adjacent to the main panel or in a basement, crawl space, or other location. If there is a grounding wire to the range, disconnect it. Make sure the power to the unit is off.

Servicing Fuses

If the range or oven is receiving power but doesn't work, the unit may have its own fuse or circuit breaker assembly. This assembly is usually located under the cooktop of the range. In some units, lift the top of the range to gain access to the fuse assembly; or lift the elements, remove the drip pans, and look on the sides of the cabinets. Inside the oven, look to the back to spot the fuse assembly.

If the unit has this additional fuse or breaker system, components such as the oven light, the range heating elements, the timer, and a self-cleaning feature may be separately fused.

If these components or features fail to work, don't overlook the possibility that the fuses have blown. To replace a blown fuse, unscrew the old fuse and install a new one of the same type and electrical rating. If the unit has circuit breakers, push the breaker or reset button, which is usually located on the control panel.