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What are the deal breakers of a home inspection?


NorthWoods inspector Manny Nevarez inspects the roof of a home in Sacramento, Calif., before it goes on the market.
NorthWoods inspector Manny Nevarez inspects the roof of a home in Sacramento, Calif., before it goes on the market.
Max Whittaker/Getty Images

When you go to the doctor for an annual physical exam, you get professional feedback on your health. Often, this is when you learn if you have any medical issues that need to be resolved. And just like you can't fail a physical (no matter how poor your health may be), a house can't fail an inspection.

A home inspection is simply a visual examination of a house's overall condition. The home inspection report describes a house's physical shape and identifies what might need crucial repair or replacement. Although what's covered in a standard report can vary by inspector, typically the status of the following will be included: heating system, central air conditioning system, interior plumbing and electrical systems, roof, attic, visible insulation, walls, ceilings, floors, windows, doors, foundation, basement and all structural components.

So, what are the deal breakers of a home inspection? That depends entirely on you. What is and is not a deal breaker depends on each person's preferences and needs. For example, an inspection that identifies damaged floor joists might be a deciding factor for one person who feels the problem is too expensive or time-consuming to fix.

However, the same trouble with joists might be absolutely acceptable for another client who has resources to fix the issue. A home inspector does not tell a customer whether or not to buy a house. Rather, it's his or her job to provide all the available information so that home buyers (or sellers) can make the decision right for them.


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