How Air Tubs Work


Holistic Practices for Air Tubs
It's easy for those interested in aromatherapy to add scent to their bathing experience by adding essential oils in a hidden compartment within an air tub's cabinet.
It's easy for those interested in aromatherapy to add scent to their bathing experience by adding essential oils in a hidden compartment within an air tub's cabinet.
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While air tubs are widely used for relaxing and reviving muscles, many people use them for their holistic benefits in the form of aromatherapy and chromatherapy. Holistic medicine is described by the American Cancer Society as focusing on "how the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual elements of the body are interconnected to maintain wellness or holistic health." Many air-tub manufacturers have combined holistic practices of aromatherapy and chromatherapy with the medically accepted benefits of hydrotherapy [source: American Cancer Society].

The practice of aromatherapy, using naturally occurring scents to promote the health of the body, mind and spirit, has become a large part of the air tub experience. Users drop oils onto a pad inside a hidden canister near the rim of the air tub. This canister is situated in the path of the compressed air that comes from the air pump. So when the tub is turned on millions of bubbles carry the scent through the water and back into the air [source: National Associating for Holistic Aromatherapy, MTI Baths].

Aromatherapy and air tubs are a perfect fit. With an air tub, you also have the ability to mix bath oils and salts directly into the water. Introducing these extras to a whirlpool can cause their pumping systems to clog. This doesn't happen in air tubs because they don't pump water.

Recently, tub manufacturers have also added lighting options to their tubs. This practice is known as chromatherapy or color therapy and allows the user to add color to the water in the tub using underwater lighting. Chromatherapy is known for giving practitioners a sense of calm and balance [source: The Body Healer].

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Sources

  • American Cancer Society. "Hydrotherapy." March 7, 2011. (Jan. 8, 2012) http://www.cancer.org/Treatment/TreatmentsandSideEffects/ComplementaryandAlternativeMedicine/HerbsVitaminsandMinerals/hydrotherapy
  • Be Jane. "Backyard Swimming Pools." (Jan. 8, 2012) http://www.bejane.com/backyard_swimming_pools
  • The Body Healer. "What is Chromatherapy?" (Jan. 8, 2012) http://www.thebodyhealer.com/healingsystems/energyhealing/chromatherapy/
  • Consumer Reports. "Types: Weigh the type of massage you want against noise and cost." January 2008. (Jan. 8, 2012) http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/home-garden/bed-bath/bathroom-remodeling/whirlpool-tubs/whirlpool-tubs-805/types/
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  • MTI Baths. "Aromatherapy." (Jan. 8, 2012) http://mtibaths.com/about-products/tubs/options/aromatherapy
  • National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy. "What is Aromatherapy?" (Jan. 8, 2012) http://www.naha.org/what_is_aromatherapy.htm
  • Press, Edward. "The health hazards of saunas and spas and how to minimize them" American Journal of Public Health. August 1991. (Jan. 8, 2012) http://ajph.aphapublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/81/8/1034
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  • Swart, Peter, et al. "United States Patent Application Publication -- Air Bath." Feb. 6, 2004. (Jan. 8, 2012) http://www.google.com/patents?id=dueRAAAAEBAJ

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