Green Construction

Green construction is a hot new trend in building and construction. Green construction involves using recycled materials and utilizing the concepts of sustainable design. As the concepts gain popularity, using them will become second nature.

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Compared to standard heating and air systems, going green is better for the environment -- and your wallet because they use less energy. So what kind of green HVAC systems are on the market today? Read on to find out.

By John Perritano

Are geothermal heating and cooling systems really better for the environment? If so, which system uses less energy and can actually save you money?

By John Perritano

Whether or not you go through the process of getting certified, following LEED guidelines as you build a new home or renovate an existing property can mean significant energy and money savings. But is it worth the extra upfront costs?

By Christie Mattheson

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Does living in a house with no cold drafts, no temperature variations, and, virtually no heating or cooling bills sound too good to be true? Well it's possible in a passive house. See what some of the other benefits of this building standard are.

By Beth Brindle

In a passive house, winter woes (or summer highs) are a thing of the past. Why? Because they're built to maintain comfortable indoor conditions without a conventional furnace, boiler or HVAC system. Read on to see how.

By Beth Brindle

One of the best places to get guidance on building an eco-friendly home is the U.S. Green Building Council's for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program. Better known as LEED, it's designed to help you create a greener place to live.

By Christie Mattheson

Clean energy technology is more advanced than ever before and can be as beneficial for your wallet as it is for the Earth. But what exactly is green construction technology?

By Wesley Fenlon

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Low-VOC, zero-VOC and natural paints have been a buzzed-about innovation in home improvement and green building for about a decade. But can you get low-VOC paint for your home's exterior?

By Jacob Clifton

Green homes have come a long way from the prototypes (and stereotypes) of the early days. Now you can find eco-friendly architecture that is as attractive as it is comfortable.

By Terri Briseno

Air Krete is a foamed cement used instead of fiberglass or other insulation to keep your house toasty warm in the winter and relatively cool in summer. But what are some other interesting facts about this product?

By Garth Sundem

If your kitchen countertops always look like you just cooked a Thanksgiving feast no matter how hard you try to clean them, then it's probably time to replace them. But with so many eco-friendly options available, which one is actually the greenest?

By Sarah Alban

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Air Krete is a cement-based insulation product whose primary component is magnesium oxide. But what makes Air Krete different from other types of insulation?

By Garth Sundem

Green demolition is dismantling a building in such a way that its elements are reused or recycled instead of ending up in landfills. Find out what green demolition is in this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

You're building a new home and want to make it supremely green. Consider the LEED rating system as your guide to building an ultimately eco-friendly abode.

By Matt Sailor

Construction on residential homes and commercial buildings can vary greatly. See how LEED takes those major differences into account in it eco-friendly certification program.

By Matt Sailor

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Hemp as a building material might seem like a fairy tale, but it's not. One of the most common uses of industrial hemp is actually insulation, and it can help cut down your energy bills. So why is hemp so prohibitively expensive in the United States?

By John Perritano

Homeowners are now beginning to discover the color of home insulation isn't just pink. It can also be green -- as in eco-friendly. But does it cost an arm and a leg?

By John Perritano

Many of the green design features that modern homebuilders use to improve new homes' efficiency have their roots in very old design and construction techniques. What are some of most historic green homes?

By Matt Cunningham

Some homeowners are opting for eco-friendly tools to lower their electricity usage and stop stressing the power grid. Others vow to cut down on oil and gas. So what are some of the best green tools on the market?

By Denise Harrison

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As housing prices rise and people become more concerned about their environmental footprints, green construction has been gaining popularity. So what are some unique, eco-friendly alternative housing ideas?

By Becky Striepe

With the increase in "green building," cool roofs are becoming popular. These are roofs that have been built or modified to maintain a lower temperature in bright sun. We'll examine some of the many ways you can cool your roof.

By Beth Brindle & Melanie Radzicki McManus

"Greening" your roof -- that is, adding a layer of grass or garden atop your house is a great way to cut down on heating and cooling costs while beautifying the area. But it can be costly. How can you reduce your expenditure?

By Beth Brindle

Building a new home is the perfect time to add green features that will help you lower your energy costs. But choosing the right ones isn't always easy. Here are 10 to help make the decision process a bit easier.

By Danielle Fisher

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Recycled and reclaimed materials are becoming popular construction options as people look for greener ways to build. But could building a recycled home be as simple as stacking up the bottles from your recycling bin?

By Rebecca Fairley Raney

The drive for energy-efficient building comes down to a quest for the so-called tight envelope, which you can often achieve using renewable, recycled material. What are some of the latest energy-efficient building materials?

By Rebecca Fairley Raney